family photos, Film, newborn photography

wendy b photos roundup {cleveland family photographer}

2018 seems to have gone by really quickly- I remember being freaked out about going to Costa Rica with my husband for a weekend trip he earned at his place of business. I get scared to travel anywhere (I’m mid mental breakdown about a trip to Maui, HI I’m taking very shortly). Even though I like going to these cool new places, I get totally freaked out. Leaving my kids, my responsibilities… shouldn’t I be trying to book work rather than take time off? Ugh. This Maui trip is messing with my head pretty badly, especially when I look back and see I didn’t book a single thing for January but to be fair, my daughters have been out of school until the 7th, I have to be back home in PA on the 12th for an event, and I leave on the 15th, almost all of my weekends are spoken for.
cr1-22wmcr2-1wm

cr2-14wm
I tried to set focus, and handed my camera to my husband. One shot came out.

cr2-18wm

I got to shoot some really great newborns, and I’m looking forward to meeting even more babies this year (it’s never too early to book your newborn session, please PLEASE do not wait until the last minute).
Lilly-68wmccs-2wmEDS-90wmEDS-56wm

I shot so.much.film; I loved every freaking second of it. There hasn’t been a single shot that I was like, “Oh dang, missed it,” because even the shots that don’t come out perfectly, are perfect. Photography has always been about the moment, right? So sometimes, what matters isn’t what is “in focus” but what’s going on around the focus. Maybe that’s too meta. IDK. So many pictures of 2/3rds of our cats (the tuxedo cat is Fiffen/ Olive, the orange and white one is Beep)…

9.18-23wm9.18-219.18-199.18-5octnov 18-20octnov 18-16octnov 18-14

So many pictures of my long suffering daughters who are juuuuust about finished being my little models…

octnov 18-32octnov 18-279.18-14wmoctnov 18-26

Cakes, and milestones, and families…. 2018 was a pretty full year of lots of good things.

Fryz Familyjfox-5wmtaps-4wm

Best Tummy of 2018 ^^

I don’t have any idea what 2019 will bring. If we’ve worked together, I’d love to see you again. I’d love for you to tell a friend about your experience, I’d love to give you both referral credits 😉 I’d love for you to ask for a film session (yes, I am offering film for client work now). I’d love to keep growing this business. I really would. Every year it gets harder and harder, but you guys keep me going and I thank you for that. On to 2019 friends. Let’s see what we can create together. Check out https://www.wboycephotos.com and when you’re ready, email me: wendy@wboycephotos.com. Whatever you want, we can make it happen. 

Photography help, photography how to, Uncategorized

Photography how to: create star bursts

    Oooooh, bright shiny lights. I love how the tree is glowing and the lights are bursting, don’t you? I’m going to talk you through how you can take a picture of your family’s tree (if you have one). You will need a basic understanding of photography, you’ll need to understand shutter speed, but that’s not super hard 😀
    You’ll need:
  • tripod or something sturdy to set your camera on
  • camera with timer and manual settings
  • pretty lights to photograph (I have a crap load of lights on my tree and still want MORE! ahaha)
  • an dark night… ooh

You might want:

        • a remote shutter release

So, first things first- turn off all the lights. Light is the number 1, most important thing you need when taking pictures, and in this case, you need to eliminate all outside light because you want the only light source to be your tree.

You’re going to set your shutter speed to a really, slow, really long which is why you need something sturdy to set your camera on. Any tiny movement will RUIN THE SHOT FOREVER! Well, ok, it’ll just ruin that one shot but you’ll have to reshoot and if you’re a perfectionist, that’ll drive you crazy. My shutter speed on the above was 13 seconds– the shutter was left open for 13 full seconds allowing all the twinkly light to enter. I had my ISO turned as low as I could, which is 100. Your ISO setting tells your camera how much available light there is- a low number means there’s lots of light and the camera doesn’t need to compensate for that. A high number means there’s very little light. Logically, you’d want to set your ISO to a higher number since there is very little light- BUT in this case we are going to make up for the low light with a slooooooooow shutter speed.

I closed down my aperture to F-11; there’s a long explanation about the blades in your lens and angles, so you can read up on the specifics and I encourage you to but I’m not going to get into it all. You’re going to want to be stopped down to at least F-11, the further down you’re closed the more dramatic your burst will be.

Next, you’re going to frame up your shot. Select your focus point, you can pretty much just point it toward the middle and go at it. Your lens will be stopped down so almost everything will be in focus. Remember, you need something sturdy to hold your camera or you’re going to get motion shake. Use a tripod, or, rig up something sturdy to angle your camera correctly. If your camera has a timer setting USE IT. If your camera has a remote setting, invest in a remote.  I use the word “invest” loosely–I have this little guy . $7 folks. Worth it if you have a Nikon DSLR (there are millions for Canon and other bodies as well). Go ahead now and take your first shot. How’d it look? Good? No good? Post your picture to my Facbook page wendy b photos. If you don’t like what you got, shoot again!

You can use the settings I have listed as a starting point, but if your photo isn’t “right” make adjustments and try again. Every situation is different, you may have more or fewer lights on your tree, you might have more ambient light, make the adjustments for YOUR specific situation. And, feel free to ask for help 😀

f-11 13″SS 100 Iso

Film, Uncategorized

Film snapshots {cleveland film photographer}

Early today, in a photography group I belong to on Facebook, we were talking about “going back to film”. I’ve mentioned before that there was no “going back” to film- I didn’t ever really shoot film, except for little point and shoot pictures like was the only thing available to most of us in a pre-digital era. There are so many fun things I’ve already waxed poetic about when it comes to film- I just wanted to share some of my personal photos, all taken on film. I’ve been using a Nikon FG and a Nikon F100 lately. My daughter Lilly has commandeered my much loved Vivitar v3000s and she has been shooting with it ❤ I’ll include a photo or two of hers, as well! I buy film on Amazon, and have it developed with Old School Photo Lab  If you have any questions about working with film, leave a comment!

blueberry-6
My good friend Adrienne took my daughters and me to Greenfield Berry Farm for blueberry picking!

blueberry-13blueberry-18blueberry-19

6.18 visit-5
Olive, didn’t have her mouth open but full of attitude

6.18 visit-9
My girls’ elementary school read “Wonder” and this was the poster that hung in the hall

6.18 visit-27
My sister’s boys and my girls

wb-2wm

wb-6wm
Clients! On film! haha! Mindy was very awesome to allow me to grab a few photos with my F100

wb-12wm
My favorite mugs, my second favorite beverage. (Dr Pepper is my #1)

wb-15wm
skies on film forever. 

wb-16
My Lilly, who has taken up photography herself ❤

lilly film-1
Lilly’s sky photo– light leaks like WHOA… so so so pretty

lilly film-5
Lilly’s photo of her twin sister’s ballet stance

lilly film-14
So far, my favorite picture of Lilly’s. This is her twin sister Molly, just running and playing. Sun star? Check. Light and shadow? Check. Both of my babies? CHECK! 

Photography help, photography how to, Q&A, Uncategorized

Published like crazy! {community not competition}

My second and third articles were also published on Pretty Presets for Lightroom’s blog!

These articles are geared toward new photographers generally, but established ‘togs will enjoy them as well 🙂

Thank you photog family for being so supportive. #communitynotcompetetion

WBP daydreamer

family photos

Moms in the Picture

It’s Mother’s Day this weekend here in the States, and this week I’ll be sharing some of my favorite #momsinthepicture over on my Facebook page. I was inspired to do so, with help from the good people at Pretty Presets who’ve written up some helpful blog posts to help you get in the picture.

You are worth so much more, than a shaky selfie shot. We get so caught up in how we look; is our “mom muffin” showing? Is our grey hair visible?  Can you see the bags under our eyes? These worries make us shy away from being in photos. What message are we giving our kids, when we dog on ourselves over how we look in photos?

Photos immortalize us. They are tangible evidence that WE LIVED. Exist in photos, make sure your children, your children’s children and so on know YOU LIVED.

Check out the helpful bog posts from Pretty Presets Blog HERE!  And while you’re at it, why not book a family session for yourself? I’ve got some gorgeous nights available in June AND July that would be perfect for families! Email me, wendy@wboycephotos.com for information or to book your session! 

photography how to, Uncategorized

How to: create a holiday silhouette

A year or so ago, I typed up a post about silhouettes but because Word Press is sort of the devil, it got eaten and is lost in the pits of internet mystery. So here goes with Take 2: Holiday Silhouette.

Long story short– expose for your tree lights, focus on your people, under exposing the people. Voila! Silhouette.

girls-silhouettewm16
ISO 200, f 1.6, 1/40th, 35mm 1.4 lens used

I just asked my daughters to stand in front of the tree and BE TOTALLY 100% STILL FOR PETE’S SAKE JUST STOP MOVING. (proud parenting moment  -_-)

But I had good reason to demand they be totally still. If you know anything about photography you know LIGHT MATTERS. Light is the single most important factor in your photography but when you shoot this, you want NO LIGHT. Why is that, Wendy?

Glad you asked. To create this specific holiday silhouette, your only light source will be your tree. If you have day light, lights on in the room- you will have a harder time getting that soft bokeh from your lights on your tree. But when you have pretty much zero light, you’re going to need to use a super slow shutter speed. When you have a super low shutter speed, any movement will look like a ghosty blur. No bueno.

What you’ll need in addition to a basic understanding of the manual settings of your camera:

  • tripod or something sturdy to set your camera on
  • holiday lights, the more the better. DO NOT wrap your kids in holiday lights.
  • a kid or two who will STAND STILL FOR THE 100TH TIME, I SWEAR TO GOD. (swearing to god optional). Also good for practicing with, stuffed animals because they are the best at being still when people are in the room.
  • a DLSR camera

Handy to have:

  • remote shutter release

First things first, mount your camera on your tripod or Sturdy Thing. You’re going to keep your ISO low, and your shutter speed SLOOOW like I said above. You can up your ISO a little bit, but don’t go to high or you will risk too much light on your people. My ISO was set to 200. My shutter speed was set to 1/20th– if I was trying to hand-hold my camera at that shutter speed the silhouette would be a motion blurry mess.  If you have a remote shutter release, it’ll be nice to use so you don’t risk shaking the camera even on your tripod when you push the shutter release.

Next you’re going to set your f-stop. I was set to 1.6 since my lens is pretty baller and I knew I would be able to get both girls in focus with it. For super beginners it’s sometimes suggested that your f-stop equal the number of people in your picture, so with 2 people, I could have set my f-stop to 2.8. If your lens only goes to 3.5, just remember to move your subjects farther away from the tree (some day, I’ll teach you all about depth of field and why it matters).

You should be good to give it a shot. Set your person or stuffed animal up, and take a test shot! How’d it look? Was your subject in silhouette? Was it a little brighter than you expected? If so, you can speed up your shutter, or close down your f-stop. Were the lights little pin pricks? Slow down that shutter even father! Show me in the comments on wendy b photos what you got!

Photography help, photography how to, Uncategorized

Photography how-to– adjusting settings for DARK rooms

I asked over on my Facebook page if anyone had some photography questions I could help with. One of the respondents said that she was having trouble with her pictures coming out dark and in some cases, blurry. This is a pretty common complaint so I’m going to talk about a few things that may help you get that shot. You will need a basic understanding of photography and the exposure triangle, but I’ll try and explain the whys and whats of everything! If there’s something you’re unsure of, leave a comment and I’ll get back to you 😀

These tips will be most beneficial if you have an SLR, but you can try to make it work if you’re using a point and shoot. Most newer PNS cameras have a settings option.

If you remember nothing else, remember this– LIGHT LIGHT LIGHT. You need light, the more the better.  These photos were taken during a recital rehearsal and it was asked that no flash be used. Obviously in a large, dark auditorium, there won’t *be* a lot of light. So what can you do?

blur1
settings: SS 1/5th, ISO 400, f3.8 focal length 20mm

Let’s take a look at this photo my friend was kind enough to let me use for demonstration; it’s a little dark, but the biggest issue is the blur.

The shutter speed was to slow  at 1/5th of a second which lead to motion blur. I keep my shutter speed close to 1/100th of a second when I’m working with kids. You need a fast shutter when your subject is ALSO fast 🙂 But how do you keep your shutter speed high, without getting a totally black picture since that fast shutter doesn’t let in as much light?

The first thing you’ll want to do in a super dark room, is turn up your ISO. Your ISO setting tells your camera’s sensor how much light is available, or how much light to compensate for in very basic terms. If there is a lot of light, you set your ISO to a low number, if it’s a big, dark place your ISO needs to be high– 800, 1600, maybe 3200. You’ll want to experiment with your camera though- a high ISO introduces film grain.  You can see that the ISO was set to only 400. My friend could have turned up just that ISO alone and would have been able to use a faster shutter speed which would have reduced the motion blur. Problem solved!

A note about grain: To most people a little grain isn’t noticeable, and in most cases if you print a typical snap shot some grain won’t be super detrimental to your print- though, I wouldn’t print larger than a 5×7 of a photo that was visibly grainy (have I lost you? Take a look at a post my friend and photo-inspiration Katy wrote about grain).

This next photo is the perfect DARK example. Whoa.

dark-room-2
SS 1/25th, ISO 1600, f 6.3, focal length 150mm

You can see from the settings that the ISO was high, so why was this still so dark? In this case, it’s the f-stop (f 6.3) which may have killed the photo. I know this was shot with a zoom lens; when you zoom in (that 150MM is zoomed in) your aperture closes down. When your aperture is closed down, it doesn’t let the light in. If you have the ability, open up! If you can’t open your aperture, you’ll have to zoom with your feet. Physically move yourself closer, zoom out and you will be able to open your aperture more. If you’re not able to be up and moving around, get in early and get as close as you can- be that mom (or dad), ha!

To review, if you know you’re going to be in a dark room, turn your ISO up- way up, keep your shutter speed as close to 1/100 as you can, and open up your aperture! Let as much LIGHT in as you can. Like always, your individual settings will vary from shot to shot so get to know your camera so you can adjust on the fly like the pros 😀

Need more help? Have questions about shooting in manual? Leave a comment and I’ll try to be in touch!

photography how to, Uncategorized

Star burst street lamp

At Christmas time, I showed you how to create a star-burst effect with your tree lights. The neighborhood I live in is lined with street lamps and every night I want to photograph them! If you’re in Northeastern Ohio, you know it’s been *really* cold. Really cold + expensive electronics = OH NOZ!

A few nights ago, I got sick of waiting out winter and decided to set up my tripod, camera and remote shutter right in my foyer and shoot through my storm door. I can see two lamps really well, but this spring/ summer, I’m going to head out on to the sidewalk and get more of the neighborhood 🙂

Look how cool these star-bursts are!

twinkle-lamps-3wm twinkle-lamps-2wm twinkle-lamps-1wm

Super love that. Have you tried to create any star bursts? If you need directions, you can find them HERE 😀

photography how to, Uncategorized

How to: create that twinkle light backdrop

So, a little while ago, I told you not to wrap your kid in holiday lights but to instead try something like this set-up, which is good advice and you should totally take it. m-twinkle-lights-1wm  But… maybe you don’t know *how* to do such a thing! No worries, I can help you get started. You are going to need to put your camera in manual mode, or at least *AV*/ *A* aperture priority and you’ll need a basic understanding of your camera’s manual features. If these words are Greek to you, maybe call in the pros and ask about a mini session 😉 Otherwise, it’s pretty easy to do.

What you’re going to need:

  • a bunch of Christmas lights on a WHITE WIRE
  • an SLR camera and lens — I used a Nikon D7000 and Nikon 50mm 1.4 lens but entry level bodies and lenses will work just fine with a little tinkering
  • a solid color background
  • something to hang your lights on

You may want:

  • a white sheer curtain
  • a couple boxes of cheap-o laminate floor
  • speedlight– do NOT use your on-camera flash. It only points forward and will ruin EVERYTHING! ::dramaz::

The first thing you’ll want is something to string lights on. I have a backdrop stand, and used an ivory piece of vinyl backdrop from The Backdrop Shop, but you don’t need a “real” drop; if you have a solid, light color wall in a room that gets LOTS of sun light you could tape lights to your wall. You can use a full size sheet (a twin size white sheet will work if you have only one person in the picture).

This is a pull back of my set up, shot with a wide angle lens. I have a 6×6 backdrop, about 12 pieces floating laminate floor and 2 strings of 150 white lights. If you want to load up your lights, you can buy more, but I think this is plenty.  After you hang your lights, wash your hands!

DSC_0089
(also, sweet vintage sled, right?) Shooting in a purple room poses challenges, so I would suggest trying to shoot in a light, neutral colored space. Sooner or later, that purple room will be painted (again, for the 3rd time) a neutral shade as I start offering more sessions in my home space.

You’ll need to set your lens to it’s widest aperture. I know my lens isn’t its sharpest wide open, so I keep it around to 1.8 or 2. You’ll also want your child out as far away from your lights as you can get while still being able to frame the shot well. Depth of field gives us that blurry background with those glowing orbs of light and works when you are closer to your subject than your subject is to whatever is behind it.

My settings were f 1.8, SS 1/250, ISO 160 with my white balance set to flash since I had to use my speedlight. I  used my speedlight because I was taking a picture in the early evening when there isn’t a ton of natural light available. I bounced the speedlight on a 45o angle behind me.  I could have adjusted my settings; slowed my shutter speed, ratcheted up my ISO or opened all the way to 1.4 buuuut I have a speedlight and truly, there was very little natural light.

Once you have your settings… set, it’s time to start! You may have to change your settings around here and there. If you don’t like what you’re seeing, adjust your settings. It’s best to take test shots with something like a stuffed animal- something that won’t get peeved at you for taking time to adjust.  Once you have the shot you like, add in your model! I had my daughter sit on the sled to have her up a little higher and a touch farther away from the backdrop. Remember you want to be closer to your kid than your kid is to the lights, but having your lens as open as possible helps a LOT if you don’t have much space.

I took a few practice shots and really didn’t like the look of the lights- they glow pretty yellow (which yea, I could have set a custom white balance but eh) so I put a white, sheer curtain panel over them. It softens the color of the bulbs and creates a sort of faux- bokeh. You can see in the pull-back picture that the lights are still pretty sharp and that is for sure NOT what I wanted.  Draping the sheer made it so soft and perfect.

DSC_0086If I had moved my daughter out more the lights would be even larger orbs. I could also use my 35mm lens so I can be zoomed out some and able to get closer to my kids! All kinds of adjustments can be made. I’ll keep shooting and if you’re not getting what you want, keep trying! It’s worth it, promise.

m-twinkle-lights-3wm